How to warm up before a workout? | Body Nutrition UK News blog
How to warm up before a workout?

How to warm up before a workout?

Whether you're determined to work out outside even when it's frigid or prefer the convenience of your at-home gym (aka your living room, bedroom, or garage) in winter, there's one step you must take first: warm-up.

Dr Alison Putnam from Ballard's Sports Medicine Clinic, a physicist, explains how to warm up for exercise and why it's so vital.



Why is it vital to warm up? 

Warming up has many advantages beyond making you appear like a glazed doughnut.

"Raising your blood flow and muscle temperature can increase your range of motion and reduce stiffness, which we believe can contribute to less damage," Putnam adds. Although the research on whether warming up before exercise lessens the chance of injury is equivocal, the preponderance of evidence points to it.

For good reasons: attempting to extend a frozen rubber band without first warming up your muscles is like trying to stretch a frozen rubber band. A warm rubber band is stretchy and flexible, whereas a cold rubber band is more prone to shatter or break.

While the preponderance of evidence in favour of warming up before exercise to minimize the risk of injury is equivocal, research that looks at whether or not warming up reduces the risk of injury is somewhat inconclusive.

How to warm up?

Following are the ways:

Bodyweight squats

 If you plan to do any loaded squats throughout your workout, bodyweight squats are a great warm-up. Squats help warm up several muscles at once and prepare your central nervous system for work because they are a complex full-body action.

Steps to follow

Place your feet hip-width apart and slightly move your toes forward or out to the side.

Slowly lower down your hips until your thighs are parallel to the floor, involving your core and keeping your back straight.

Pause with your knees over, but not beyond, your toes for a few moments.

Exhale and stand up again.

90 90

Internal and external rotation will help open up the hips with the 90-90 movement. This move appears to be a passive stretch, but it is an active movement that stretches the gluteus muscles. Stop immediately and consult a specialist if you experience any pinching pain in this position.

Instructions in a Step-by-Step Format

You should be able to stand up tall and straight like an alpha man. If you raise your left arm erect, your left knee should line up with your left arm, and your hip and shoulder should line up.

To maintain your position, place your right hand alongside you,

palm down, and finger-pointing at your back.



Hip circles

Hip rotations are a fantastic technique to lighten up your hips," explains Burrell. "These are essential for prepping for lower body workouts if your hips are tight, as mine are." Tight hips might prevent surrounding muscles, particularly the glues, from firing effectively, causing other body parts to compensate and become strained.

Place your feet together and stand tall. Raise one leg to a 90-degree angle. Make a large circle with your knee, rotate the hip out. Make as easy a movement as you can while remaining stable. Do not stress your body.

Slowly circling for eight reps, then changing directions for another eight reps.

Arm reach

Start with your feet wider than hip-width apart in a standing position. Swing your right arm across your chest while pivoting on your right foot. In the same way, twist your torso and upper body. Rep with the other arm right away. Repeat for 30 to 60 seconds.

Side reach

Start with your feet wider than hip-width apart in a standing position. Lean towards the right side of the body, gently bending your right knee. Simultaneously, extend your left arm at a diagonal to the sky, in alignment with the rest of your body. Extend your left leg laterally as much as you can. Rep on the opposite side right away. Repeat the same for 30 to 60 seconds.

Knees lift

Begin with your feet wider than hip-width apart in a standing position. Flex your arms and place them behind your head. Raise one leg toward your body, bending your knee as you do, as though you're attempting to touch your rib cage with it.